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Resources

Josh Lloyd tries to do "what Mother Nature does" on his farm near Clay Center, Kansas. That means a no-till system combined with the planting of a polyculture of cover crops -- turnips, radishes and canola -- in rotation with his sorghum and wheat acres.
Caldwell, Jeff. 2009. The great crop rotation cover-up. Agriculture Online.
 
This is a literature review of cover crop benefits from Dabney et al. 2001 and Dabney 1996.
 
Oilseed radish is a unique cover crop that farmers are planting to improve their soil quality for economic crop production.
 
Interest and use of cover crops as a practice to reduce high nutrient and sediment levels along existing water sources has increased across the Midwest.
 
Cover crop decision making chart for the year after corn.
 
Cover crop decision making chart for the year after cereal grains.
 
Cover Crops Rotations after Cash Grain Crop
 
Nitrogen is required for adequate residue production from cereal cover crops used in notill cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production, but residues can immobilize N needed by cotton.
 
Using cover crops to convert to no-till.
 
Soil compaction is a common and constant problem on most farms that till the soil.
 
2008 Cover Crop Innovator Project.
 
Cover crops improve no-till corn.
 

Great Lakes Cover Crop Initiative Watershed Coordinators

A highly qualified crop consultant (watershed coordinator) has been identified in each watershed to provide one on one technical support to the producers who participate in this program. These people will meet with producers and help them make important decisions to ensure a successful transition to using a cover crop and conservation tillage system.  
 

Lake Michigan Coordinator

Christina Curell
Central Region Water Quality Educator, Mecosta
14485 Northland Drive
Big Rapids, MI, 49307
Phone: (231) 592-0792
Cell: (231) 287-8617
Email: curellc@msu.edu
Christina graduated from Michigan State University with a Bachelors of Science in Animal Science. Following graduation she worked briefly with a agricultural consulting firm as an IPM scout in potatoes. She then accepted a position with the Mecosta Conservation District as the Groundwater Technician working on the Michigan Groundwater Stewardship Program. The program was then transferred to the Mecosta MSU Extension Office where she has worked in a multi-county and state wide roles supporting the local grant as well as grants throughout the state for the past 14 years. She is currently housed in the Mecosta County Extension office with her assignment being water quality for livestock and crop production. Christina lives near Reed City with her husband and 3 young sons.

Lake Erie Coordinator

Florian Chirra
Extension Educator
OSU Extension Williams County
1122 W High St
Bryan, OH 43506
Email: chirra.1@cfaes.osu.edu
Phone: (419) 636-5608
Florian worked in a local farm co-op for twelve years, the last several years he managed a fertilizer plant.  Returning back to college he graduated from Michigan State University with a Bachelors of Science in Animal Science. Following graduation he worked on a swine farm. He then accepted a position in his home county as an Extension Associate as an Agriculture Agent. To maintain his position he return to graduate school and graduated from Michigan State University with a Master Degree in Animal Science. As an Extension Educator he has presented classes in animal science, agronomy, pesticides, farm management and water quality issues. Florian lives on a small farm near Pioneer Ohio with his wife Patricia.

Lake Huron Coordinator

Paul Gross
Isabella County MSU Extension
200 N. Main Stret, 3rd Floor
Mt. Pleasant, MI  48858
Phone: 989-773-1622 ext 302
Email: grossp@msu.edu
Paul was raised on a dairy farm in central Michigan. He graduated from Michigan State University with a B.S. in Agribusiness and Natural Resources Education. Since 1991, Paul has been County Extension Director and Field Crops Educator in Isabella County Michigan. During that time he was an active member of the Field Crops Area of Expertise Team as well as the Forage Team. His programming has included planning, developing, and implementing field crops and forage research and educational programs in Isabella and the surrounding counties. On farm research include corn, soybean, and wheat variety trials, tillage, nitrogen management, and wheat fungicides. Workshop topics include integrated pest management, corn and soybean field days, commodity marketing workshops, pesticide education workshops, cost of production workshops, and farm safety programs. Paul is a member and past president of the Michigan Association of Extension Agents as well as member of the Isabella County Farm Bureau. Paul and his wife Karen have three grown children.