Conservation Tillage Photos and Graphics

Instructions

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Close look at old corn stalks left standing from past harvest. The standing stalks helped catch additional snow over the winter to provide more moisture for the newly emerging (green) soybean plants. The stalks and other crop residue will slowly decompose to help nourish the new plants.

Size: 1000 x 668 pixels (297k)

Source: CTIC
 


New corn plants growing among crop residues left from a previous harvest. Crop residues reduce runoff from farm fields to improve water quality.

Size: 1000 x 672 pixels (447k)

Source: CTIC



Standing stalks of corn (in the foreground) will slowly decompose to provide a natural mulch for the new seeds that are to be planted by the oncoming tractor.

Size: 671 x 1000 pixels (176k)

Source: Farm Journal

 



Rows of soybean plants emerge from a field covered with old corn stalks from the previous harvest. These soybeans were planted in narrower (15-inch) rows because as they mature their big leaves will quickly shade the ground, making it harder for the sun to warm weed seeds that may lie between the rows. This natural canopy from the growing soybean plants can help farmers reduce the need for herbicides (weed killers).

Size: 671 x 1000 pixels (253k)

Source: CTIC/ Dan Towery


No-till: Anchor farmer is using a drill (another name for a very narrow row planter) to plant a new crop amid the corn stalks left from the old harvest (no-till). Drills are used to plant small grain seeds like wheat and rye. Farmers also use them to plant soybeans and take advantage of the (ultra narrow) 7.5-inch rows to provide natural weed protection and higher yielding crops.
1000 x 671 pixels  Size: 329k
Source: Farm Journal


The farmer on the lead tractor is mowing cotton stalks following harvest while another farmer follows him with a type of planter known as a drill. The drill is planting rye grass into the cotton stalks and other crop residues that have been left from past harvests. These crop residues slowly decompose, helping to protect and build the soil in the field while helping nourish the newly planted seeds.
1000 x 701 pixels   Size: 474k
Source: CTIC/Mitchell


Pretty, green cotton plants emerge from a field that was previously planted to wheat. The stalks left from the wheat harvest provide the soil in the field with protection against erosion caused by high winds. The old wheat (crop) residues also keep more water on the fields and serve as a natural filter during heavy rains.
Size: 1000 x 612 pixels (534k)

Source: CTIC/Mitchell


A tractor pulls a large (12-row) planter through a field, depositing seeds in the soil while hardly disturbing the surface of the field (no-till). The field is covered with stalks and other crop residues from a past corn harvest. These crop residues will protect the soil while nourishing the new crop.
Size: 997 x 1000 pixels (566k)

Source: Case

 


The rows in this field have been ridged by farming equipments system known as ridge-till. The farmer then plants new seeds on top of each ridge while keeping the stalks and other crop residues on the surface of the field.
Size: 1000 x 679 pixels (417k)

Source: CTIC


This graphic explains some of the benefits of no-till and illustrates the no-till planting method. (this graphic most appropriate for use in corn growing or row crop regions of the U.S.)

Size: 890 x 1000 pixels (47k)

Source: CTIC


The graphic explains some of the benefits of no-till and illustrates the no-till planting method (this graphic most appropriate for use in wheat or small grains cropping regions of the U.S.)

Size: 885 x 1000 pixels (44k)

Source: CTIC

 


This graphic explains how the no-till cropping system works throughout the growing season (this graphic most appropriate for use in corn growing or row crop regions of the U.S.)

Size: 760 x 1000 pixels (40k)

Source: CTIC

 


This graphic explains how the no-till cropping system works throughout the growing season (this graphic most appropriate for use in the wheat and small grains cropping regions of the U.S.)

Size: 759 x 1000 pixels (36k)

Source: CTIC